Wagner celebrates 100 years in business by publishing a book,  Preserving Washington History

Wagner celebrates 100 years in business by publishing a book, Preserving Washington History

Preserving Washington History – 100 Years of Wagner Artistry Wagner Roofing Celebrates Its Centennial With A Beautifully Illustrated Book Showcasing Craftsmanship Through The Years Since its earliest days, Washington, D.C., has attracted architects, designers, builders, art collectors, entrepreneurs, and politicians from all over the world. They loved the excitement of the city and the chance to design and build something special in the capital city. These figures include Major Pierre Charles L’Enfant, who developed the plan for the city in 1791 for President George Washington, Stanford White who designed The Washington Club/The Patterson Mansion in 1903, and James Hoban and Benjamin Henry Latrobe who designed the White House in 1792 and noted landscape architect, Frederick Law Olmstead who helped design the National Zoo in 1889. Not all of the buildings designed and built during the early years of Washington, D.C., have been preserved, but more than 500 survive and are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, including 74 National Historic Landmarks of the United States. Fifty-seven Washington, D.C., sites are featured in this book. This book showcases a unique craft, roofing and sheet metal, and its importance in preserving these treasures. Wagner Roofing has been dedicated to promoting and protecting this important craft for the past one hundred years, and the company has played a significant role in restoring and replacing the roofs and other sheet metal work of such historic landmarks as The National Cathedral, the Smithsonian Castle, Woodlawn Plantation, Lincoln’s Summer Cottage, US Department of the Treasury, The Old Post Office, and more. This book documents the beauty and variety of the buildings of Washington,...
Two Weekend Anniversary Parties Highlight Powerful Washington Businesses

Two Weekend Anniversary Parties Highlight Powerful Washington Businesses

Two Weekend Anniversary Parties Highlight Powerful Washington Businesses The Four Seasons Hotel turned 35, and Wagner Roofing turned 100. By Carol Ross Joynt The other honoree this weekend was Wagner Roofing. Who? Take a look at the firm’s list of clients, easily a match for the Four Seasons roster: the White House, the US Naval Academy, the Maryland State House in Annapolis, DC’s Old Post Office Building, Lincoln’s Cottage, the Mormon Temple, the Smithsonian Castles, and the Washington National Cathedral. We could go on, but do we really need to? Chuck and Sheila Wagner hosted a party on Saturday night at Congressional Country Club to mark 100 years since Wagner’s grandfather, Otto, founded the company in Northeast DC. (It is now based in Hyattsville, Maryland.) It’s not often that a Saturday-night country club party also features a display of tools. But this one did, including mallets, hammers, stakes, cleats, and soldering irons. Oh, and cocktails and sushi, too. Sheila and Chuck Wagner, vice president and president of Wagner Roofing Company, at the 100th-anniversary party their company held on Saturday evening at Congressional Country Club. Click here for full...
Students Touch New Steeple at Maryland Church

Students Touch New Steeple at Maryland Church

Students Touch New Steeple at Maryland Church August 25, 2014 marked the culmination of 10 months of Wagner Roofing working closely with the parish of Holy Redeemer Catholic Church in Kensington MD to replace their steeple. The original 1962 steeple collapsed and fell onto the church roof from the 70’ high bell tower during the devastating derecho storm  of June 29, 2012. Wagner worked with the Church’s insurer to establish an upgraded replacement scope of work. Wagner hired a structural engineer to perform a complete existing condition survey of the bell tower and develop schematic and construction drawings for the project. Copper Craft of Grapevine TX was enlisted as the steeple manufacturer that designed and fabricated the new spire and cross. A local steel erector was subcontracted to install new support steel and set the 34’ main spire and 8’ cross atop the existing bell tower. Coincidentally, the installation happened to coincide with the first day of school for Holy Redeemer’s 430 students and their parents. All children were given the opportunity to touch the new cross as it lay on the lawn prior to being hoisted 100’ into the air to be set atop the steeple where it will retake its position as the neighborhood landmark. Father Mark Hughes said “What a great opportunity for these kids to be able to drive by here years from now and point out to their kids the cross, noting that they touched it before it went all the way up there where no one else will ever touch it.” Wagner will complete installation of a copper standing seam roof tying the...
How I became a family firm’s first non-family president

How I became a family firm’s first non-family president

How I became a family firm’s first non-family president… Wagner Roofing has been around for 100 years, 99 spent under Wagner family leadership, most recently owners Chuck and Sheila Wagner. That changed this year when Dean Jagusch, a nonfamily member and New Zealander, was tapped for the president’s job. Now he plans to build on the company’s century-old groundwork — with touches of his own leadership style. What did you do before Wagner? I spent 11 years with a local operating unit of a large roofing consolidation. I worked there in various roles — estimator, project manager. I became the local operating unit president and then, most recently, was working on the corporate side running a region of 12 offices for them. Why did you choose Wagner? I had an interest in getting back closer to the core business. Chuck Wagner and I had connected, and it was obviously very appealing that he had a 100-year-old, family-owned business that’s been well established in the Washington area. Wagner works on a lot of unique and very interesting buildings, and I definitely had an interest in that side of the business. Since I’ve been here, some of the more significant buildings that we’ve worked on have been the DAR Constitution Hall, the National Shrine, obviously the Cathedral — we’ve done some stuff on there — and the U.S. Naval Academy. Were those unique projects part of the reason you were attracted to Wagner? Absolutely. It’s trying to create your own kind of marketplace or really distinguish yourself from the pack. I think Wagner’s done a tremendous job of that, and obviously...

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